Saturday, November 4, 2017

Added more wraps to main sail furler screw

When we furled in the main sail, it was touch and go whether we'd get the sail all the way in with just the UV cover showing. There was invariably some sail materiel showing outside the mast once the inhaul furling line reached the stop on the boom.
The furling line was also pulling on the bolt which attaches it to the furling unit, there were no wraps around the furler at this point, the line just came straight back from the furler.
Now, I was thinking I would add a couple of extra wraps on the furler when we drop the main sail but a neighbor on my dock said I should be able to do it without dropping the mainsail. Just pull the furling line through the deck and the blocks, then push the end around the furler unit a couple of times and then pull it back through the deck.
I did this last night and was careful to run a mouse line from the in haul line so I could pull it back again when I was done. It looks like this now
After adding 3 wraps
There were no wraps on the furler at all before I did this. The in haul line is pretty crappy, I don't believe it was new because it was pretty hard and has lost flexibility. I'll replace it soon. The other thing is that the line was already not long enough to get 3 wraps around the cabin winch so with these 3 wraps on the furler, that took maybe another foot out of it so the stopper knot almost meets the cabin top clutch for the in haul now. It definitely needs to be about 10 feet longer. I think this is why they rigged it the way they did. They seem to have had an odd piece of line which they used for the in haul and to have enough line at the winch, they didn't wrap the furler unit.

Anyway, it furls really easily now all the way in with no issues besides the in haul line stopper almost makes it to the clutch now but that's ok for now.

Privacy blind for main cabin

The entrance from the cockpit down the stairs is made of a transparent plastic/acrylic materiel. This looks pretty but lets anyone behind your boat see in the main cabin at night time. We made a simple velcroed on blind from fender blanket which we bought from sailrite. Some Velcro on the panel sticks to the blanket materiel easily and this then covers up the cabin hatch at night. Very easy to make and to use.
Velcro attached to starboard side

Velcro attached to port side

2 velcros at bottom of hatch

Blanket attaches to Velcro readily

Fire extinguishers and EPIRB mounted

We have 3 x 10lb BC fire extinguishers on the boat per coast guard code. They were in boxes until today. I mounted them in the following positions so they are easy to get to rather than buried in some locker/lazerette.
EPIRB and cockpit/galley extinguisher

Engine port extinguisher

Forward berth extinguisher
I mounted them with some stainless steel self tapping screws. The plywood looks like 3/8 inch if I'm lucky. The one on the stairs is going nowhere, it's resting at the bottom on the top step. The rear cabin one is close to the engine extinguisher port and is on an incline and it's the rear of the boat so I think that one is pretty secure also. The forward berth one could possibly fall off if we were beating in to heavy seas so I may move that one to the other side of that bulk head and put it on the floor basically.

Monday, September 11, 2017

B&G WIFI-1 stopped working

I upgraded all the software on the boat electronics I could about 2 months ago. That means V4.5 for my Zeus 2 plotter and anything else that was recommended.
After doing this, the WIFI-1 stopped working. By this, I mean, the plotter couldn't see it. It was however, still transmitting on the SSD I setup but the Zeus refused to acknowledge it was even connected on the bus. I tried shutting down the boat power to reboot it, no joy.
The dealer ended up replacing it with another one and that worked straight away. I don't believe the other one was broken but this is what it took to get the plotter to see it again.
I can now connect the boat to a WIFI hot spot, download updates (which I did) as well as predict wind weather straight to the plotter. I just have one WIFI-1 on the boat so it's the hotspot or reconfigure it so my tablet can be used as a remote plotter display.

First haul out

I hauled out the boat before the winter rush. The dealer came and repaired the forward holding tank release valve. I had the anodes replaced and the bottom painted with Pacifica Plus. The marina service yard did that work. You cannot paint the bottom yourself in New Jersey, you need a license.
Total cost was 1900 US for this. I'm planning on leaving the boat in the water over the winter and staying on it a little and sailing when I can.

Saturday, July 22, 2017

First 100 hour yanmar engine service and more on sailing lessons

Liberty Landing Marina has a service department who are Yanmar authorized and to automatically extend my yanmar warranty from 2 to 5 years, it needs to be serviced by such a dealer. I asked them to do my 100 hour service and the total cost was 632 dollars which is mostly 4 hours of labor (125 ph I think) and parts.

The sailing lessons are going well. We're improving a lot and gaining confidence when sailing and for me, docking is now pretty routine, at least so far.

Things I bought recently for the boat are more dock lines (5/8 x 50 ft) and a mantus anchor/mooring bridle.

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Docking trials and lessons

We took the boat out a few times but it was very clear to us that we'd forgotten most of what we learned on our ASA 104 week last year and that we needed docking instruction immediately. We had managed to dock the boat a couple of times backwards pretty well but we had a very bad docking experience a couple of weeks ago and luckily avoided damaged our boat or other peoples boats so that was the point basically where I decided I wasn't taking it out again without instruction first.

So, we looked around for a school. I was going to do the Maryland School of Sailing's docking course but the couple of times I emailed them, they have never answered so that was that. I called the Manhattan sailing school and asked about instruction on my boat and they can't do that for insurance reasons but they put me in point with one of their instructors, Mike, who we are very happy with.

He took me out for about 3 hours the first day. The initial idea was to stay in the canal and get used to turning the boat in a narrow space using the engine but I wasn't comfortable and was basically afraid of hitting something so we went in to the hudson and played around there. I gradually figured out /remembered how it works and then we went back to the canal. It seemed a lot bigger now and I was better able to spin the boat in the canal using engine pulses and so on. Eventually, it came time to do a docking attempt and I went in bow first and it worked pretty well. We came out again and then repeated another couple of times. Mostly, this went well except for a couple of times where I came in at too shallow an angle by turning early.

The next day, Mike came again but we went sailing for 3 hours instead. That went well and things started coming back to us about how this all works again. The docking went well also and I brought the boat in and Mike was showing my wife how to do the dock lines.

These 6 hours were hugely valuable and have made a huge difference on confidence and handling for me. I'm by no means an expert yet and we'll likely be using Mike a couple of times a week through this year to gain more skill and confidence.

Slip wise, we are adding an 18" inch inflatable globe fender which rolls on a post to avoid the boat hitting the corner of the slip and damaging the boat.